Dutch Stuff

Dutch Stuff

The Netherlands, Designers –

SIMONE POST is one of a handful of Netherlands-based designers who is getting global attention for wide-ranging and experiment-driven work

 

Dutch Stuff

 

Vlisco Recycled Carpets by Simone Post

 

FURNITURE CREATED USING near-extinct marquetry tehcniques, ceramics etched with human hair, objects’ sensorial perceptions with our bodies.

These were some of the exciting elements that unfolded against the raw industrial backdrop of the Old Truman Brewery, where the recent eclectic Dutch Stuff exhibition featured furniture, lighting, textiles, ceramics and installations from the most innovative minds based in the Netherlands today.

 

A Chat with Textile and Product Designer Simone Post

Simone Post: The research process is the best, trying out different materials and techniques. You discover unexpected outcomes – things surprise you

 

The Design Academy Eindhoven graduate’s work is characterised by material experiments, a love for colour, print and craft, and re-using discarded material. She has a penchant for the unexpected outcomes of experiments and the beauty found in semi-finished products. Simone owns her own studio called Studio Simone Post, and is showcasing her ‘Vlisco Recycled Carpets’, made by using leftovers as well as rejected textiles, at the Dutch Stuff fair 2018.

Stoel
Eco-oh! – Plastic diamonds made with recycled plastics

 

Describe the style of your creations in 3 words.

Colourful, sustainable, experimental.

What are your favourite materials to work with and why?

I like textile and yarns because of their infinite possibilities with colour mixing; also drawing with pencils and markers gives me complete freedom to create new patterns; I like wood as the material is very editable and you can create a ‘ 3D object’ within a few steps. I always prefer to use leftover materials – there is already so much stuff in the world. Why use something new if there is so much out there to start with!

How do you sketch your ideas?

I like to sketch in 3D, not with a computer programme but ‘live’ – directly with the material. I start by making small models with all the basics and scrap I have in my studio: wood, paper, cardboard, yarn, colours, and so forth.

The research process is the best, trying out different materials and techniques. You discover unexpected outcomes – things surprise you because what you thought would happen turns out to be something completely different. You should always start experimenting with an open mind!

For designing patterns, I always start by hand with pencils and markers. This is very important to me in getting my own handwriting and ‘me’ in the design. Later, I will translate it and finalise the design on the computer.

What local Dutch food do you crave for after a hard day at work?

I must say for dinner I love to eat food from all over the world. I love the fresh herbs of Vietnamese cuisine, for example. But more importantly for having the best working day, I always start my day with a good Dutch breakfast.

Matured Gouda Cheese – For having the best working day, I always start my day with a good Dutch breakfast: a nice glass of milk (nowhere as good as in The Netherlands!) and a toasted wholegrain firm bread with nice Dutch cheese

 

What advice do you have for a young student who wants to be a respected Product Designer like you?

Discover other cultures. Don’t get lost in the world of the internet – experience life in real life. And most important of all just start creating and making, and start making a lot! Always be open to trying out new crafts and techniques.

 

Story by Carol Kraal. All Photograph copyrights are explicitly reserved with Label/ Breed. Feature portrait photograph by Jaap van Rijn; Vlisco Recycled Carpets photograph by David van der Stel. Press material courtesy of Zetteler, UK